Scheme of assessment

Find past papers and mark schemes, and specimen papers for new courses, on our website at aqa.org.uk/pastpapers

This specification is designed to be taken over one or two years.

This is a linear qualification. In order to achieve the award, students must complete all assessments at the end of the course and in the same series.

AS exams and certification for this specification are available for the first time in May/June 2017 and then every May/June for the life of the specification.

All materials are available in English only.

Aims

Courses based on this specification should encourage students to:

  • develop and apply an informed, analytical framework for making, performing, interpreting and understanding drama and theatre
  • understand the place of relevant theoretical research in informing the processes and practices involved in creating theatre and the place of practical exploration in informing theoretical knowledge of drama and theatre
  • develop an understanding and appreciation of how social, cultural and historical contexts of performance texts have influenced the development of drama and theatre
  • understand the practices used in 21st century theatre making
  • experience opportunities to create theatre both published text-based and devised work
  • participate as a theatre maker and as an audience member in live theatre
  • understand and experience the collaborative relationship between various roles within theatre
  • develop and demonstrate a range of theatre making skills
  • develop the creativity and independence to become effective theatre makers
  • adopt safe working practices as a theatre maker
  • analyse and evaluate their own work and the work of others.

Assessment components

Component 1: Interpreting drama

This component is a written exam in which students are assessed on their knowledge and understanding of how drama and theatre is developed and performed (AO3) and on their ability to analyse and evaluate the live theatre work of others (AO4).

The paper constitutes 40% of the AS.

Students have 2 hours to answer the paper.

The paper is divided into two compulsory sections:
  • Section A: Drama through the ages
  • Section B: Live theatre production.

In the exam students are expected to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the subject content.

See Knowledge and understanding

Section A: Drama through the ages

Updated

In Section A students answer one two part question (from a choice) on a given extract from one of the set plays listed below.

Specific editions are not prescribed for these plays. However, we've listed the editions we use to set questions.

If you wish to use a different edition, we recommend you source a copy of the one we use to make sure it's similar. This will enable your students to access the questions on the paper. Adaptations are not appropriate.

The choice of set plays for the AS exam from 2017 onwards is:

Playwright Set play
Sophocles Antigone (The Three Theban Plays, translated by Robert Fagles, Penguin, 1984, ISBN: 0140444254)
William Shakespeare Much Ado About Nothing (ed Claire McEachern, Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2016, ISBN: 1472520297)
Carlo Goldoni A Servant to Two Masters (ed Lee Hall, Methuen Drama, 1999, ISBN 0413748502)
Henrik Ibsen Hedda Gabler (Student Edition, Bloomsbury, 2002, ISBN: 0413770702)
Bertolt Brecht The Caucasian Chalk Circle (ed Eric Bentley, Penguin, 2007, ISBN: 0141189169)
Dario Fo Accidental Death of an Anarchist (Methuen Drama, 1987, ISBN: 0413156109)
Jez Butterworth Jerusalem (Nick Hern Books, 2009, ISBN: 1848420501)

The focus of the questions is how the extract might be interpreted in performance to create meaning for an audience.

Students must adopt the perspective of a performer, designer (lighting, sound, set, costume) or director as appropriate to the question.

Students should support their creative ideas with close reference to the text and in answer to questions about design, with sketches and/or diagrams.

Students are expected to know and understand how the play has been constructed to be performed and to communicate meaning, and how the play is informed by its social, cultural and historical context. Students should include reference to the social, cultural and/or historical context of their selected play in their answer to the first part of the question. Students should note the guidance on the exam paper about what constitutes a 'section' of the play.

Section A is marked out of 50 in total; 25 marks for each part of the question.

Students are permitted to refer to a clean copy of their chosen play during the exam. This must not be annotated and must not contain any additional notes, marks, alterations or inclusions.

Students must not answer Section A and Section B of the exam on the same play ie the live production seen cannot be their set play.

Note for teachers whose students may take AS and then A-level: students taking the A-level exam must not answer on both Butterworth’s Jerusalem from List A and Teale’s Brontë from List B. This prohibited play combination does not pertain to this AS qualification in any way. This note is here to aid future planning.

Section B: Live theatre production

In Section B students answer one two part question (from a choice) on the work of theatre makers in a single live production they have experienced as an audience member as part of their course.

They are expected to refer to particular moments within the production.

They should be able to discuss a variety of aspects of one theatre production giving a personal evaluation and analysis of the theatrical elements that contributed to its success or lack of success.

Students are assessed on their knowledge and understanding of the subject content detailed in Knowledge and understanding as well as their analytical and evaluative skills.

Section B is marked out of 30 in total; 15 marks for each part of the question.

Students must not answer Section A and Section B of the exam on the same play ie the live production seen cannot be their set play.

Component 2: Process and performance

This is a practical component in which students are assessed on their ability to create and develop ideas to communicate meaning as part of the theatre making process making connections between dramatic theory and practice (AO1), apply theatrical skills to realise artistic intentions in live performance (AO2) and analyse and evaluate their own work (AO4).

Component 2 constitutes 60% of the AS.

It is marked by teachers and moderated by AQA.

For this component students must practically explore (workshop) and interpret two key extracts each from a different play and complete two assessment tasks:

  • formally present Extract 2 to an audience
  • produce an individual Portfolio documenting work on both Extract 1 and Extract 2.

Each student's contribution to the performance of Extract 2 is marked out of 30.

Their Portfolio is marked out of 30.

For the performance of Extract 2 students must apply the work and methodologies of one of the prescribed theatre practitioners on our set list (see Prescribed practitioners).

Performers and directors in the same group must select the same practitioner. Designers may select different practitioners. All practitioner choices must be compatible.

Each student should seek to ensure that their work is fully consonant with the intentions and methods of their selected practitioner.

Only Extract 2 must have a prescribed practitioner applied.

The key Extract 1 may have:

  • no practitioner applied
  • the same practitioner applied
  • a different practitioner applied.

Guidance on key extracts

Updated

Students are required to practically explore (workshop) and interpret two key extracts (Extract 1 and Extract 2) each from a different play.

The two plays chosen must:

  • each have been professionally commissioned or professionally produced
  • as a whole be a minimum of 35 minutes in duration if performed in full
  • offer interpretive opportunities for performers, designers and directors
  • be rich and of substance in terms of content, context, theme and/or characterisation
  • offer an appropriate level of theatrical challenge to students at AS
  • be deemed age-appropriate by the Head of Centre who must submit a declaration to AQA confirming that he/she has approved the plays chosen for practical study
  • be different plays from those set plays studied by the student for Component 1
  • not be similar to each other in terms of their social, cultural and historical context
  • not contravene the prohibited play combinations below.

Teachers must ensure that all students have sufficient opportunity to demonstrate their chosen specialism (to enable them to access the full range of marks).

Prohibited play combinations for Component 2

Set play studied for Component 1 Student must not study any other play that is:
Antigone Classical Greek tragedy
Much Ado About Nothing Elizabethan comedy
The Servant of Two Masters Commedia dell’Arte
Hedda Gabler 19th century naturalistic tragedy
The Caucasian Chalk Circle Post World War II epic
Accidental Death of an Anarchist 20th century political farce
Jerusalem 21st century anarchic realism

Schools/colleges must seek AQA approval of their play choices by submitting a Play Approval Form directly to their allocated AQA AS/A-level NEA (non-exam assessment) adviser. Teachers must seek approval well in advance of the visitng exam date in case they are not approved. All play approval forms must be submitted by 31 January at the latest.

Play choice approval is an essential part of the specification. Failure to seek timely approval will be treated as maladministration and failure to gain timely approval may result in delays to your students receiving a moderated mark.

If your school/college is new to teaching this specification, please contact AQA to be allocated an AQA NEA Adviser.

The key extracts chosen must be significant to the play as a whole ie pivotal to plot, character(s) or theme(s).

The key extracts chosen must be continuous and individually last at least 10 minutes in duration if the full extract were to be performed.

Students can perform an abridged version of the key extract if needed (to provide a coherent performance within the minimum performance times stated) but the wording itself must not be modified.

Students are not required to perform the full key extract for assessment but both key extracts must be explored practically in their entirety during the course.

We advise the following steps to choose the key extracts:
  • Step 1: Choose a play (adhering to the requirements above) and start to explore the play practically.
  • Step 2: Focus on one section of the play. The section must be substantial, which is defined as taking at least 10 minutes to perform if performed. Large groups will need to study a longer section, (see Step 3). Students should study the section chosen in depth, taking time to thoroughly explore and interpret it.
  • Step 3: Identify how much of the section needs to be performed to meet the relevant AQA minimum performance time. The minimum performance time varies depending on the number of performers in the group. If the group is large, collectively the group is likely to need to perform the whole section they have studied (which may have needed to have been more than the minimum 10 minutes, see Step 2).
  • Step 4: Repeat for another play.

NEA Advisers are able to provide guidance about the selection and use of key extracts.

Specialisms

For each key extract students must choose to be assessed as a:

  • performer
  • lighting designer
  • sound designer
  • set designer
  • costume designer
  • puppet designer
  • director.

Costume designers may choose to include make-up and/or hair and/or masks. Set designers may choose to include design of props.

They may choose the same specialism or different specialisms for each key extract studied.

Requirements in relation to number of students per specialism are as follows:

Specialism Requirement for each performance
Performer Between two and six students
Lighting designer Maximum of one student
Sound designer Maximum of one student
Set designer Maximum of one student
Costume designer Maximum of one student
Puppet designer Maximum of one student
Director Maximum of one student

In the case of only two students entering, both students must nominate themselves as performer.

Cross-sex casting is permitted.

Students must apply their chosen specialism as follows:

Specialism chosen Requirement
Performer Must perform one character/interpret one role1
Lighting designer Must create one lighting design
Sound designer Must create one sound design
Set designer Must create one set design
Costume designer Must create one costume design for one performer
Puppet designer Must create one puppet design
Director Must direct the extract

1Or more than one role if appropriate eg in a multi-role play.

Teachers must ensure that students have the opportunity to take an equal and active role in the creative and collaborative process regardless of their chosen specialism.

All designs must be assessed in live performance:

  • For lighting designers the lights and lighting effects must be seen in the live performance.
  • For sound designers the sound and sound effects must be heard in the live performance.
  • For set designers the set seen in the live performance should follow the student's design.
  • For costume designers the costume designed must be worn in the live performance by the relevant character.
  • For puppet designers the puppet designed must be a part of the live performance.

Design students are not assessed on their ability to operate equipment associated with their design.

Therefore although all students are encouraged to develop their theatrical skills to their full potential the following applies:
  • Lighting designers are not required to operate the lighting equipment in the live performance.
  • Sound designers are not required to operate the sound equipment in the live performance.
  • Set designers are not assessed on the set's construction.
  • Costume designers are not assessed on the costume's construction.
  • Puppet designers are not assessed on puppet construction and need not be the puppet operators during the live performance.

Assessors must assess the design and not its execution.

Designs should be realised in performance to the full extent possible within any practical constraints.

Design students must work to support performers (and director where applicable) and create a design which supports and enhances the live performance work. Students should have an awareness of how their design will impact on the live performance as a whole.

The performance of Extract 2

Updated

Each student is required to contribute to a duologue or a group piece.

The assessed performance for this component cannot be a monologue.

Type Performance duration2
Duologue (two performers) Must be between four and ten minutes
Group performance (three or more performers) Must be between five and thirty minutes

2Students are not required to perform the full key extract.

For group performances playing time for each performance should reflect the number of performance students in the group. For example a group with six performance students should work to the upper time limit.

Teachers are required to ensure minimum performance times are met.

If a student’s performance does not meet the required duration a penalty is applied to the mark (the size of the penalty depends on the severity of the timing infringement). It may also result in schools or colleges being investigated for maladministration.

Assessment evidence

The performances/designs presented for assessment must be the student’s own work.

Students and teachers will be required to sign a Candidate record form (CRF) to fully authenticate each student's work.

Programme notes

Teachers must provide programme notes for the moderator stating the title of the piece and the name of the practitioner selected.

The programme notes must include photographs of each student so that each student is clearly identifiable to the moderator.

The programme notes must also state each student’s chosen specialism and if they are performing, the character(s) they are playing.

In addition each student must offer a statement of their individual dramatic intentions to justify their theatrical choices and provide the moderator with a context for the productions he/she is assessing.

The Statement of Dramatic Intentions must be completed by the student on the template AQA provides. This statement is not assessed directly but should be used to support assessment. Assessment must not take place without reference to the student’s Statement of Dramatic Intentions.

Recording

Assessed performances must be recorded with a single camera from an audience perspective from start to finish and be unedited.

Each student being assessed must identify themselves by name and candidate number at the start of the recording.

Students must also state their chosen specialism and chosen plays and if they are performing, the character(s) they are playing.

Close-ups of set, costume and puppet design students’ work must be included at the beginning of the recording.

Teachers are required to ensure all recordings meet minimum performance times.

Full details of our requirements for recordings are provided at aqa.org.uk/drama

Supervising students

It is expected that during the rehearsal process teachers will support students through the provision of workshops.

Teachers may provide guidance and support to students so that they are clear about the requirements of the task they need to undertake and the marking criteria that will be used.

Teachers may provide guidance to students on the suitability of their response to the task particularly if it means they will not meet the requirements of the specification. Teachers must follow JCQ instructions regarding the provision of feedback to students.

For authentication, regular monitoring should be undertaken by the teacher so that the work is seen at each developmental stage.

Students do not have to be directly supervised at all times during performance preparation but there must be adequate supervision to ensure that work can be authenticated.

Teachers are not permitted to provide any guidance to students whilst the assessed performance is being carried out.

Other requirements

Each performance must be carried out in live performance conditions and under stage lighting. There is no requirement upon students to present their key extract within a full production context ie with full set and costumes.

All performance preparation and the live performance itself must be carried out in a setting which has been formally risk assessed and deemed safe.

The performance space should enable the student to fulfill their chosen role as much as possible.

Students should be aware of health and safety factors as they relate to both their chosen role and the performance piece as a whole.

Non-examinees are permitted to perform alongside performance candidates, but only where absolutely necessary in order to make the group size up to the minimum number of performers. They must be students not staff.

Technical support may be provided to design students. This may be by non-examinee students or staff.

Portfolio

Each student is required to submit a Portfolio in which they:

  • explain their creative and interpretative processes in the specialism they have chosen (actor, designer, director) in relation to both key extracts
  • analyse and evaluate their individual contribution to the success of the final performance.
The Portfolio must comprise two sections:
  • Section 1: Research and performance development (20 marks)
  • Section 2: Analysis and evaluation (10 marks).
Section 1: Research and performance development

In this section students explore the dramatic possibilities of the two key extracts in relation to their chosen practitioner and consider how they developed and refined their ideas to formulate their final dramatic intentions for performance.

Students must explain:

  • the possibilities offered by each of the key extracts in performance and the opportunities/challenges presented when applying the ideas and methodologies of their chosen practitioner
  • the opportunities arising from the social, cultural and historical contexts of each of the key extracts
  • their own individual dramatic aims and intentions and those of the duo/group
  • how they developed and refined their initial ideas, developed their dramatic aims and intentions and how they incorporated the work and methodologies of their chosen practitioner in these evolving ideas
  • how their final ideas and intentions were realised in performance with reference to the key features from the practitioner’s working and production practices that they have adopted.
Section 2: Analysis and evaluation

This section offers students the opportunity to demonstrate their analytical and evaluative skills in relation to the final performance of one key extract to a live audience.

Students must analyse and evaluate their individual contribution to the success of the final performance, with reference to how successfully they applied the ideas of their chosen practitioner.

Assessment evidence

The Portfolio evidence presented for assessment must be the student's own work.

Details of admissible evidence types for the Portfolio can be found below:

Evidence for the Portfolio must be one of the following: Suggested length per section The Portfolio must not exceed in total (evidence beyond this must not count towards the mark)
Entirely written 600–800 words 3,000 words
Written accompanied by:
  • annotated photographs and/or
  • annotated sketches/drawings and/or
  • annotated cue-sheets.
3–5 A4 pages 20 pages
Written accompanied by audio/visual/audiovisual recording(s)

300–500 words and

3–5 minutes

2,000 words and

18 minutes

Entirely audio/visual/audiovisual recording(s) 5–6 minutes 20 minutes

Details of our requirements for recordings are provided at aqa.org.uk/drama

Students and teachers will be required to sign a Candidate record form (CRF) to fully authenticate each student's work.

Supervising students

Students do not have to be directly supervised at all times whilst they are completing their Portfolio. However there must be adequate supervision to ensure that work can be authenticated.

Teachers may provide guidance and support to students so that they are clear about the requirements of the task they need to undertake and the marking criteria that will be used.

Teachers may provide guidance to students on the suitability of their response to the task particularly if it means they will not meet the requirements of the specification.

Teachers must follow JCQ instructions regarding the provision of feedback to students.

Assessment objectives

Assessment objectives (AOs) are set by Ofqual and are the same across all AS Drama and Theatre specifications and all exam boards.

The exams and non-exam assessment will measure how students have achieved the following assessment objectives:

  • AO1: Create and develop ideas to communicate meaning as part of the theatre making process, making connections between dramatic theory and practice.
  • AO2: Apply theatrical skills to realise artistic intentions in live performance.
  • AO3: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how drama and theatre is developed and performed.
  • AO4: Analyse and evaluate their own work and the work of others.

Assessment objective weightings for AS Drama and Theatre

Assessment objectives (AOs) Component weightings (approx %) Overall weighting (approx %)
Component 1 Component 2
AO1   20 20
AO2   30 30
AO3 30   30
AO4 10 10 20
Overall weighting of components 40 60 100

Assessment weightings

The marks awarded on the papers will be scaled to meet the weighting of the components. Students’ final marks will be calculated by adding together the scaled marks for each component. Grade boundaries will be set using this total scaled mark. The scaling and total scaled marks are shown in the table below.

Component Maximum raw mark Scaling factor Maximum scaled mark
Component 1 80 1 80
Component 2 60 2 120
Total scaled mark: 200

Assessment criteria

The assessment criteria below details the mark bands with descriptors for the assessment of students' work.

Component 2: Process and performance assessment grids

Component 2 is marked by the teacher out of 60 marks, with marks divided as follows:
  • Performance of Extract 2 AO2 (30 marks)
  • Portfolio Section 1: Research and performance development AO1 (20 marks)
  • Portfolio Section 2: Analysis and evaluation AO4 (10 marks).

Marking the Performance of Extract 2

This is the mark scheme to be used for the Performance of Extract 2 in Component 2.

There are 30 marks available. Award either one mark, two marks, three marks, four marks or five marks for each of the following six criteria.

The assessment objective being assessed is AO2: Apply theatrical skills to realise artistic intentions in live performance.

Mark Level of theatrical skills Appropriateness of interpretation to play as a whole Sensitivity of interpretation to context Consistency of interpretation with dramatic intentions and methods of the chosen practitioner Contribution to the effectiveness of the piece Success in realising individual artistic intention
5 Exceptional level of skill, demonstrating faultless execution. Exceptionally appropriate interpretation which is entirely appropriate to the playwright’s intentions. Exceptionally sensitive to the context of the play, in an interpretation which achieves total clarity of dramatic intention. Exceptionally consistent interpretation, emulating the practitioner’s approach in every aspect. Exceptional contribution to the effectiveness of the piece which would be significantly diminished without it. Exceptional success in realising individual artistic intention in a completely sustained way, engaging the audience fully throughout the performance.
4 Excellent level of skill, demonstrating near perfect execution. Highly appropriate interpretation which is almost always appropriate to the playwright’s intentions. Very sensitive interpretation to the context of the play which demonstrates an excellent degree of clarity of dramatic intention. A unified and consistent interpretation which clearly reflects many aspects of the practitioner’s approach. Excellent contribution to the effectiveness of the piece adding much to its success. Highly successful in realising individual artistic intention in a well-sustained way, engaging the audience throughout the performance.
3 Good level of skill, demonstrating competent execution. An appropriate interpretation, which is generally appropriate to the playwright’s intentions. A thoughtful interpretation of the context of the play which demonstrates some clear dramatic intentions. A generally consistent interpretation which reflects some aspects of the practitioner’s approach. Good contribution to the effectiveness of the piece adding to its success in a number of respects. Largely successful in realising individual artistic intention in a mostly focused way, engaging the audience for most of the performance.
2 Reasonable level of skill, demonstrating mainly secure execution. A reasonable interpretation which is occasionally appropriate to the playwright’s intentions. Some awareness of the context of the play which demonstrates under-developed dramatic intentions. An inconsistent interpretation which reflects a few aspects of the practitioner’s approach. Reasonable contribution to the effectiveness of the piece adding a little to its success. A degree of success in realising individual artistic intention, engaging the audience at a number of points during the performance.
1 Limited level of skill, demonstrating insecure execution. A limited interpretation which is rarely appropriate to the playwright’s intentions. Limited awareness of the context of the play which demonstrates imprecise dramatic intentions. An incoherent interpretation which reflects few or no aspects of the practitioner’s approach. Limited contribution to the effectiveness of the piece, sometimes detracting from its success. Limited realisation of individual artistic intention, rarely engaging the audience.
0 Nothing worthy of credit. Nothing worthy of credit. Nothing worthy of credit. Nothing worthy of credit. Nothing worthy of credit. Nothing worthy of credit.

Marking the Portfolio

These are the mark schemes to be used for the Portfolio in Component 2. They are level of response mark schemes.

Level of response mark schemes are broken down into levels, each of which has a descriptor. The descriptor for the level shows the average performance. There are marks in each level. Before you apply the mark scheme to a student’s response you should review the response.

Step 1 Determine a level – Start at the lowest level of the mark scheme and use it as a ladder to see whether the response meets the descriptor for that level. The descriptors for the level indicate the different qualities that might be seen in the student’s response. If the response meets the lowest level then go to the next one and decide if it meets this level, and so on, until you have a match between the level descriptors and the response.

When assigning a level look at the overall quality of the response. If the response covers different aspects of different levels of the mark scheme you should use a best fit approach and use the variability of the response to decide the mark within the level, ie if the response is predominantly level 3 with a small amount of level 4 material it would be placed in level 3 but awarded a mark near the top because of the level 4 content.

Step 2 Determine a mark – Once you have assigned a level you need to decide on the mark. The exemplar materials used during teacher standardisation will help. You can compare the student’s response with the marked and annotated examples to determine if it is the same standard, better or worse.

Marking Section 1

This is the mark scheme is to be used for Section 1 of the Portfolio in Component 2.

There are 20 marks available.

The assessment objective being assessed is AO1: Create and develop ideas to communicate meaning as part of the theatre making process, making connections between dramatic theory and practice.

Band Mark Descriptors
4 16–20 Excellent response:
  • Explanations given in Portfolio evidence excellent skills in creating and developing ideas to communicate meaning in both extracts studied.
  • Evidence of a sophisticated response to the material.
  • Evidence of full development and refinement of skills and the piece.
  • Precise details are provided throughout.
  • Structure and reasoning is logical and systematic.
  • Responses make insightful connections between dramatic theory and practice.
3 11–15 Good response:
  • Explanations given in Portfolio evidence good skills in creating and developing ideas to communicate meaning in both extracts studied.
  • Evidence of a sensitive response to the material.
  • Evidence of a good degree of development and refinement of skills and the piece.
  • A number of precise details are provided.
  • Structure and reasoning is clear and consistent.
  • Responses make thoughtful connections between dramatic theory and practice.
2 6–10 Reasonable response:
  • Explanations given in Portfolio evidence reasonable skills in creating and developing ideas to communicate meaning in both extracts studied.
  • Evidence of purposeful engagement with the material.
  • Evidence of some concerted development and refinement of skills and the piece.
  • Only some details are given and/or details may lack precision.
  • Structure and reasoning is present but not always clear.
  • Responses make some useful connections between dramatic theory and practice.
1 1–5 Limited response:
  • Explanations given in Portfolio evidence limited skills in creating and developing ideas to communicate meaning in both extracts studied.
  • Evidence of unimaginative engagement with the material.
  • Evidence of little development and refinement of skills and the piece.
  • Details are rarely given and/or where details are given, are imprecise.
  • There is little or no structure or reasoning present.
  • Responses make undeveloped or no connections between dramatic theory and practice.
0 0 Nothing worthy of credit.

Marking Section 2

This is the mark scheme is to be used for Section 2 of the Portfolio in Component 2.

There are 10 marks available for this section.

The assessment objective being assessed is AO4: Analyse and evaluate their own work and the work of others.

Band Mark Descriptors
5 9–10

Well-developed and insightful analysis and evaluation referring in precise detail to the individual’s contribution to the success of the final performance and how successfully they applied the ideas of their chosen practitioner.

Compelling and fluently structured.

4 7–8

Thorough and thoughtful analysis and evaluation referring in detail to the individual’s contribution to the success of the final performance and how successfully they applied the ideas of their chosen practitioner.

Engaging and well structured.

3 5–6

Useful and relevant analysis and evaluation referring in detail in places to the individual’s contribution to the success of the final performance and how successfully they applied the ideas of their chosen practitioner.

Clear with some structure.

2 3–4

Underdeveloped and unfocused analysis and evaluation referring in limited detail to the individual’s contribution to the success of the final performance and how successfully they applied the ideas of their chosen practitioner.

Not always clear, unstructured.

1 1–2

Largely irrelevant and misunderstood analysis and evaluation referring in negligible detail to the individual’s contribution to the success of the final performance and how successfully they applied the ideas of their chosen practitioner.

Unclear and disorganised.

0 0 Nothing worth of credit.