If you are unhappy with your results

If you are unhappy with your results, please speak to your school about your options. 

This summer’s results days are a bit different because of the effects of coronavirus. As a result of Ofqual's decision on 17 August, students received centre assessment grades if they were higher than their calculated grades.

There are options available for students who are unhappy with their grades and feel they can't progress with the results they've received.

Ofqual has published guidance for students on understanding their grades this summer and what they can do next.

If you're unhappy with your centre assessment grades

Students should speak directly to their school if they’re unhappy with their centre assessment grades. Schools can provide information about how grades were awarded, and guidance on any further steps a student may take with their school.

Resits

Students will have the opportunity to take their AS and A-level exams in October, and GCSEs in November, if they’d like to improve their grades. They could also resit in summer 2021.

Learn more about exams in autumn 2020.

If you're considering taking summer 2020 exams, learn more from Ofqual about how exams series will run in autumn 2020.

Post-results and appeals in summer 2020

The appeals process for this summer isn’t like the usual reviews of results process. If you're unhappy with your results, please speak to your school about your options.

Your school may also be able to make an appeal on your behalf.

Making an appeal

Schools can appeal on specific grounds set out by Ofqual. Your school will have been sent details on how to make an appeal.

Learn more about appeals with AQA in summer 2020.

Bias and discrimination

If you have concerns about bias, discrimination, or any other reason why your school didn’t fairly assign your grade or ranking, you should raise this with your school in the first instance - and follow the school’s normal complaints route.

If you have evidence of serious malpractice and feel you can’t raise it with your school, it might be appropriate for you to speak directly to us.